Form: Turns

Skiing is a beautiful sport to watch. Smooth, elegant turns comprise much of a skier’s journey down the mountain, making a graceful and quick descent. All skiers, regardless of ability, can benefit from working on their turns. In this feature, we’re going to discuss the most popular and essential turns skiers can make: the Snowplough turn, the parallel turn, and the carve turn. First-time skiers will be most familiar with the Snowplough, which—despite its rudimentary appearance—can be made smooth and graceful with just a bit of confidence. See below for our descriptions and directions.

 

The Snowplough—The Snowplough, also known as the wedge turn or the pizza slice, is a beginner turning technique. To make this turn, the front ski tips are close together, and the tails are wide apart. The knees roll inwards slightly, creating a triangle. Speed is reduced by applying pressure against the snow with the inside edges of the skis. To turn, weight is shifted from the downhill (outside of the turn) ski to the uphill (inside of the turn) ski. Slight pressure is enough to make the skis change direction, and the stability afforded by the triangle shape creates maximum control.

 

Parallel Turn—The parallel turn is a method of turning in which the skis roll to one edge, allowing the edge to travel in an arc. This is the most fluid turning method, as it requires very little movement to form a graceful curve. Parallel turns occur when the skier is traveling downhill with both tips pointed in the same direction. Parallel turns generate less friction than others and are perfect for maintaining speed and minimizing effort. This style is often taught to novice skiers as a way to introduce the idea of weighting and unweighting skis, which is useful in a variety of advanced and expert techniques.

 

Carved Turn—Similar to parallel turns, a carved turn requires slightly more effort on the part of the skier. In this turn, the ski shifts to one side or the other, using the edge to carve into the snow. This turn occurs when both skis are parallel and pointed downhill. The skier places pressure on the uphill ski, rolling slightly onto the edges of both skis. This pressure is the only action necessary to create the turn, as the ski will naturally follow the arc shape to produce a turning motion. This type of turn is very efficient, allowing skiers to maintain speed without sacrificing stability.

 

Form: Ski Stance

Beginners and experts alike can benefit from analyzing and adjusting their ski stance. Your stance provides the movement and flexibility necessary to perform all skiing-related actions—from turns and tricks to simply starting and stopping. As a result, elements of the skiing stance can be applied to any number of maneuvers, thus improving your overall form.

 

First and foremost: the ski stance is not a static position. Skiing necessitates movement, so your stance must adapt to the action you are performing. Therefore, the stance is variable, shifting as you change direction, speed, and slope angle. A good stance should be able to absorb bumps through the legs and allow the body to flex, meaning the knees and other joints must be bend. Your stance should also allow your skis to assume the correct position. You should be able to both conserve energy and remain comfortable while in the stance for extended periods of time.

 

The straight stance occurs when your skis are angled downhill and you are looking ahead, traveling straight down the slope. The skis should be parallel, hip width apart, and your knees should bend to absorb bumps. The body should lean slightly forward, putting most of the weight over the middle of the skis. The arms should be out to your sides, slightly in front and with elbows slightly bent. As the gradient of the slope increases and decreases, you will need to lean forward or backward to retain your center of gravity.

 

A traversing stance occurs when you are going across the slope. Your body will lean into the mountain to combat gravity. In this position, the uphill leg is bent more to compensate for the angle of the slope. The upper body should twist slightly toward the fall line, or the imaginary line in the steepest direction of the slope. Both knees should bend to absorb bumps.

 

The leaning stance is very similar to the traversing stance; the same principles apply, but the situation changes. While the traversing stance is used to travel across the mountain, the leaning stance is necessary when making tight, slalom-like turns while heading down the mountain. It combines elements of the straight and traversing stance; the upper body and hips are placed over the middle of the skis, but the body shifts to the left and right. The center of gravity moves away from the force created by turns. The body twists slightly to the side, allowing the skier to retain balance.